Category Archives: EmployID

Knowledge Maturing and Socio-technical (Design) Patterns

At EuroPLoP 2016, we have joined the conversation with the pattern community with respect to the approach of orienting large-scale collaborative research projects towards patterns. Our contribution which outlined a knowledge maturing process for patterns received intense feedback from the community as part of so-called “writer’s workshops”. There the paper was discussed by the workshop participants with the authors as “flies on the wall”. This feedback is now incorporated into a camera ready version of the paper for the post-proceedings to be published beginning of 2017. The key contribution is that extends the perspective on the knowledge process that leads to patterns towards early phases and applies that to the context of collaborative research projects.

Apart from that it was also unique experience at a conference that put a lot of emphasis on trust building and community formation through non-competetitive group games and a lot of opportunities for informal exchange.

MATEL 2016

This year’s MATEL edition in Lyon, France (organized by EmployID members Christine Kunzmann, Carmen Wolf, and me) with more than 20 participants focused on the further developing the ideas of patterns (see an introduction into the insights from previous workshops), particularly on the challenges in dealing with motivational and affective issues in a systematic way.

A larger part of the discussion covered the spectrum of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and the interindividual differences, particularly in the context of formal education. Does it depend on the subject, such as the usual argument that for many students learning maths cannot be fully achieved through measures focussed on intrinsic motivation? Does it depend the formal context around, such as hierarchically and strictly organized companies, or the strict bachelor and master programmes that make students focus on credits and minimizing their efforts? Or does it depend on the individual identity and presumed compatibility Continue reading

Ten years of knowledge maturing

It is a strange kind of experience if you discover that the topic that you are most associated with has its 10 years anniversary. This happened to me when Ronald Maier and I together with Christine Kunzmann prepared the invited Special Track on Social Knowledge Management. I-KNOW 2015 celebrated its 15th anniversary with inviting influential paper authors to organize such a track. It was at I-KNOW 2005 when the first paper on the model was published. It was a reaction to the chasm between e-learning and knowledge management and has sensed the emerging transforming effect of a social collaboration view on knowledge management. Since then, numerous cross-disciplinary research activities have contributed to the extension and refinement of the model. At the heart is the insight that knowledge develops along distinct phases in which its characteristics and thus requirements for support change. It brings to­gether different perspectives and provides a frame­work Continue reading

Facilitation support: the new frontier for social media and learning support

Over the last two years, I have been building a course on Enterprise Social Media that put emphasis on conversations and reflection on social media from a business perspective. In this context, we have defined social media along five criteria (as many existing definitions were of ridiculous quality, such as defining social media ontop of the vague notion of Web 2.0):

  • Participation: many instead of few contributors
  • Openness: Opinions, ratings, comments are communicated openly (instead of restrictive editorial processes)
  • Conversation: Dialogue instead of one-way communication
  • Networking: Users are not isolated, but can relate to others
  • Community: Users can create groups with shared interests

Social media has become omnipresent, and many of its technical building blocks are diffusing into almost every area, including traditional enterprise systems. The technology – as it has shown – is not really exciting, but still really successful introduction of social media into companies is rare. Continue reading